Stethoscope Cover

Have a budding doctor at home? Want to personalize their Stethoscope and embarrass them at work? Learn to create a cover for their Stethoscope!

Stethoscope Cover

What you need

34 inch x 6.5 inches (86cm x 16.5 cm) of Fabric
1 inch square of Velcro or a press stud
2.5 inches (6cm) of Elastic



Instructions

Start by taking your length of fabric. Hem the 2 smaller edges for a neat finish. Fold it in half so that it is inside out (the print is facing inwards).

Following the steps in the image below, sew along the edge to close the strip to form a tube.

Stethoscope Cover Steps

Take the elastic and sew it into place at end “A” by sewing it into place around 1/2 (1.5 cm) inch from the edge.

Using glue or sewing machine secure your Velcro into place by stitching one side of the Velcro to each side of the tube. This will stop the fabric from sliding down the stethoscope.

You could also substitute the Velcro for a press stud if you wish it depends on your sewing skills as to how you wish to tackle this project.

Once you have finished turn it the right way around so that the print is facing out.

Then thread it over your stethoscope with the elastic at the bottom and the press stud at the top.

All done!

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Comments

  1. Is the cover suppose to be a lot longer than the tubing? the cover is about 33″ long but the tubing is only about 22″ long. I am making this for a Christmas gift, so I want it to be right when they receive it.

  2. Great! I tied a string around the body of the fabric so that it isn’t so bulky looking. I made this so i can throw it in the wash..I wear cover up and it gets all over the body of my stethoscope…very unsightly and very hard to clean!

  3. clydeskid says:

    I work for a home care agency and know what I am going to make for my nurses/therapists. As for those who question the sanitary issue, I do not see where this is any more risky than the clothes the nurse wear. They don’t change scrubs for every patient and when they lean over a patient (as they often have to) the material on the scrubs touch the patients, When I was in the hospital I always felt a little cheered at the bright, decorative scrubs nurse wore!

  4. Please note that the use of stethoscope covers may not be possible as the medical facility may require the entire stethoscope be disinfected bewteen patients. This is especially true for high risk environments and populations.

    As shown in several studies, the bell/diaphragm which touches the patient should ALWAYS be disinfected between patients. Or an acoustically neutral disposable cover or device might be used.

    If permitted, cloth covers, beaded covers, ID tags etc SHOULD BE WASHED FREQUENTLY JUST LIKE SCRUBS, and they should not extend into the area of patient contact over the bell/diaphragm.

  5. I think these are great! I am on my 4th or 5th stethoscope tubing in the past 10 years and they are close to $40 each. They get stiff and crack from the oils in our skin. So the covers make sense and for all the fuss of sanitary comments…….changing them after each patient is crazy!! I am not sure how you listen to your patients, but the only part that should be touching them is the bell. And where I work, if you are in a precautions room, you would not take your own stethoscope in!!! So on that note can not wait to have some of these made!

  6. Stethoscope covers

    Potential issues to examine:

    1. Are they an infection control risk?
    2. What organisms have been discovered to contaminate cloth materials used on stethoscope covers?

    Milam, M. W., Hall, M., Pringle, T., & Buchanan, K. (2001). Bacterial contamination of fabric stethoscope covers: The velveteen rabbit of health care? Infection Control Hospital and Epidemiology, 22(10), 653-655. (UM Links) (Paper copy at Library Circulation Desk)
    Takashima, M., Shirai, F., Sageshima, M., Ikeda, N., Okamot, Y., & Dohi, Y. (2004). Distinctive bacteria-binding property of cloth materials. American Journal of Infection Control, 32(1), 27-30. (UM Links) (Paper copy at Library Circulation Desk)

  7. Duh If you make several covers and wash them every shift than it should actually be cleaner. How many people clean their whole stethoscope every shift.. You are crazy to think this is worse. Also it protects your neck from irritation so you down get sores on your neck and get bacteria down in the wound.

  8. Never make a stethoscope cover! They harbor organisms and put patients at risk. any healthcare worker who uses stethoscope covers do not care about their patients. See article – The Velveteen Rabbit regarding stethoscope covers!

  9. Great idea. My neck always got a rash from the stethoscope tubing. It protects the stethoscope as well as the wearer.

  10. I think this is a great idea. And it is not unsanitary as the cloth part would not be touching the patient. As long as it was washed every so often.

  11. I am so excited about finding this project! My son is a doctor and is currently in Iraq. His two youngest daughters are making this next week to send him for Christmas. We plan to try the suggestion for elastic in the hem.

  12. Haven’t tried this project yet but look forward to making it. I have read all the posted comments. I saw on one of the doctor’s covers she had a little bow tied and sewn over where the snap or velcro would go and it was super cute! Just another idea to share.

  13. its definitely not impossible..

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